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16 min read

How to Master Recruiting

16 min read

How to Master Recruiting

Presenting Mads Faurholt-Jorgensen’s Expertise in Mastering the Art of Recruiting

In the dynamic realm of talent acquisition and human resources, the authoritative voice of Mads Faurholt-Jorgensen commands attention and respect. A seasoned professional with a career spanning several decades in the field, Mads Faurholt-Jorgensen has emerged as a distinguished thought leader whose insights are highly regarded within the recruiting sphere.

Mads Faurholt-Jorgensen’s professional journey has been characterized by a relentless commitment to excellence in talent management. He has amassed a wealth of experience, holding key roles in executive leadership, talent development, and organizational transformation. His unwavering dedication to advancing recruiting practices, by incorporating cutting-edge strategies and innovative approaches, has positioned him as a sought-after authority on this critical subject.

This article provides an exclusive opportunity to delve into Mads Faurholt-Jorgensen’s astute opinions and insights on “Mastering the Art of Recruiting.” With a robust track record of success and a profound understanding of the intricacies of modern talent acquisition, Mr. Faurholt-Jorgensen’s perspective offers invaluable guidance to professionals and organizations striving for excellence in the fiercely competitive landscape of human resources.

Let us now embark on a journey through the expert lens of Mads Faurholt-Jorgensen, as we explore the art and science of recruiting in today’s fast-paced world of work.

As a CEO and entrepreneur, I have learned that one of the most important skills for any leader is the ability to select and build the right team. It may seem like a simple concept, but it is surprising how little attention is paid to it in traditional leadership education. In fact, it can be difficult to find resources on the topic, such as books or university courses.

To illustrate the importance of team selection, I often refer to Benjamin Zander, the conductor for the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra. Zander realized that as the conductor, he was the only person in the orchestra without a sound. Instead, he relied on the carefully selected and talented musicians to create the beautiful music that he led. This is a powerful metaphor for leadership, as it highlights the importance of selecting the right people for your team and empowering them to achieve success.

Key Takeaways

  • Building the right team is the most important skill for any leader.
  • Traditional leadership education often neglects the importance of team selection.
  • Selecting the right people for your team and empowering them to succeed is critical for achieving success.

The Importance of Leadership

As a leader, I strongly believe that the most important thing for any leader and CEO to be good at is setting the right team and helping those people to achieve the results that will make them successful in their particular role. It is about selecting the right people for your company, organization or any part of your life.

Selecting the right team is not an easy task. It is not taught in universities, and there are very few books or TED talks on the topic. However, selecting the wrong person for a job can be very costly. The US Department of Labor estimates that the cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%, and the difference between average performance and top performance in a position is 67% productivity and bottom-line profits.

Moreover, selecting the wrong person for a team can impact culture, happiness, and growth. As a leader, my role is to find the right people. If I find the right people and select the right people, my job is simple. However, if I don’t select the right people, my life becomes very complicated.

To be a good leader, we need to be proactive about seeking information that can help us improve our efforts. We need to understand our cognitive biases and avoid trying to hire people who are like us or who can do everything. As a CEO or leader, we don’t need to be the smartest person in the room. We need to find people who are smarter and better than ourselves.

At my company, we have set out to build a framework that allows us to be much better at recruiting. We have developed a structured process that we believe can be one of the best recruiting frameworks in the world. We understand that we are not perfect, and we still have a lot to learn. However, we are committed to improving our efforts and selecting the right people for our team.

The Role of a Conductor in an Orchestra

As the conductor for the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, Benjamin Sander realizes the importance of selecting the right team. He understands that leadership comes down to two things: setting the right team and helping those people achieve the results that will make them successful in their particular role.

As a CEO and entrepreneur, I consider myself a recruiter. My job and role are to find the right people. If I find the right people and select the right people, my job is really simple. But when I get it wrong, I know the cost. According to the US Department of Labor, the cost for any particular bad hire for any role is 30%.

The conductor of an orchestra plays a crucial role in selecting the right team. They are responsible for choosing the right musicians and ensuring that they work together harmoniously. Just like a CEO, a conductor must have a clear vision of what they want to achieve and select the right people who can help them achieve that vision.

The conductor must also be able to communicate their vision clearly to the musicians. They must be able to bring out the best in each musician and help them achieve their full potential. The conductor must have excellent leadership skills and be able to inspire the musicians to give their best performance.

In conclusion, the role of a conductor in an orchestra is similar to that of a CEO in a company. Both must select the right team and help those people achieve the results that will make them successful in their particular role. The conductor must have excellent leadership skills and be able to communicate their vision clearly to the musicians. By selecting the right team and inspiring them to give their best performance, the conductor can ensure that the orchestra produces beautiful music that touches the hearts of the audience.

The Concept of Leadership

As a CEO and entrepreneur who has co-founded over 20 companies, I believe that the most important thing for any leader to be good at is selecting the right team and helping them achieve the results that will make them successful in their particular role. This may seem like a simplistic view of leadership, but it is a view that has been validated by experience.

Unfortunately, there are no university courses or books that teach us how to select the right people for our team. When we become leaders, we are simply expected to know how to do it. This is a problem because selecting the wrong people for our team can have significant negative impacts on our organization.

According to the US Department of Labor, the cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%. Additionally, the difference between average performance and top performance in a position can be as much as 67% in terms of productivity and bottom-line profits. Furthermore, selecting the wrong person for a team can negatively impact the culture of the organization and can lead to stress and unhappiness for both the leader and the team member.

To be effective at selecting the right people for our team, we need to be proactive about seeking out information on how to improve our efforts. Unfortunately, many of us are hindered by cognitive biases that can lead us to hire people who are like ourselves, who can do everything, or who are worse than ourselves.

To overcome these biases, we need to approach hiring like building a football team. We should look for the best attacker, the best goalkeeper, and the best defender, rather than trying to find someone who can do everything. We should also strive to hire people who are smarter and better than ourselves, rather than trying to be the smartest person in the room.

As a team, we have developed a structured process and framework for selecting the right people for our team. While we still have much to learn and improve upon, we believe that our framework can be one of the best in the world. By being proactive about seeking out information and overcoming our cognitive biases, we can improve our efforts and build the best team possible for our organization.

The Role of a Recruiter

As a recruiter, my job is to find the right people for the company or organization. It’s about setting the right team and helping those people to achieve the results that will make them successful in their particular role. I believe that selecting the right people is the most important thing for any leader and CEO to be good at.

Unfortunately, there are no subjects in university on the topic of recruiting, and it’s hard to find any books or courses on the subject. As leaders, we are just expected to be good at selecting people for our team without any formal training or guidance.

However, getting it wrong can be costly. The US Department of Labor estimates that the cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%, and the difference between average performance and top performance in a position is 67% productivity and bottom-line profits.

That’s why it’s crucial to have a structured process and framework for recruiting. Our team has developed a framework that we believe can be one of the best in the world, but we still have a lot to learn.

One of the biggest challenges in recruiting is our cognitive biases. We tend to hire people who are like us, try to find people who can do everything, and even hire people who are worse than ourselves. However, selecting the right people is more like building a football team. You want the best attacker, the best goalkeeper, and the best defender.

In conclusion, as a recruiter, my job is to find the right people for the team and help them achieve success in their role. It’s essential to have a structured process and framework for recruiting, and to be aware of our cognitive biases when selecting people for the team.

The Impact of Wrong Selection

As a CEO and recruiter, I strongly believe that selecting the right people for your team is the most important thing for any leader to be good at. It’s not just about setting the right team, but it’s also about helping those people to achieve the results that will make them successful in their particular role.

When we select the wrong person for a job, it can have a huge impact on our organization. According to the US Department of Labor, the cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%. Moreover, a study by McKenzie found that the difference between average performance and top performance in a position is 67% productivity and bottom-line profits.

But it’s not just about the numbers. Hiring the wrong person can also impact the culture of the organization, limit growth, and even affect the happiness of both the leader and the employee. As a leader, I have learned that selecting the right people for my team makes my job much easier.

However, selecting the right people is not an easy task. It’s not something that is taught in universities or even in most leadership training programs. Many leaders try to hire people who are like themselves, or who can do everything, but this approach is flawed.

Instead, we should try to hire people who are better than ourselves in certain areas. We should also avoid hiring people who are worse than ourselves, as this can limit the growth of the organization.

As a team, we have developed a structured process and framework to help us select the right people for our organization. However, we still have a lot to learn and improve upon, as cognitive biases and arrogance can often get in the way of our efforts.

In conclusion, selecting the right people for your team is crucial for the success of any organization. It’s not an easy task, but with the right approach and mindset, it can be done effectively.

The Cost of Bad Hiring

As a recruiter and leader, I firmly believe that selecting the right team is the most important thing for any CEO or leader. However, it’s unfortunate that nobody teaches us how to select the right people for our teams. The lack of education on this topic is evident as it’s hard to find any books, university courses, or TED talks on the subject.

When we make a bad hiring decision, it can cost us a lot. The US Department of Labor estimates that the cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%. Furthermore, according to McKenzie, the difference between average performance and top performance in a position is 67% productivity and bottom-line profits. But it’s not just about the numbers; a bad hire can also impact the culture, happiness, and growth of the company.

As leaders, we spend only 10% of our time on recruiting, but it’s crucial to make the right decisions. People spend 90% of their time making up for recruiting mistakes, and this can be avoided by selecting the right people for the job.

To improve our recruiting efforts, my team and I have developed a structured process that we believe can be one of the best in the world. However, we still have a lot to learn as we only understand about 20% of what we need to know. Our cognitive biases and arrogance can hinder our ability to make the right decisions.

Some of the common cognitive biases that we need to avoid include trying to hire ourselves, trying to hire people who can do everything, and hiring people who are worse than ourselves. As leaders, we should aim to hire people who are smarter and better than ourselves to create a successful team.

In conclusion, bad hiring decisions can have significant costs for the company, and it’s crucial to select the right people for the job. By avoiding cognitive biases and developing a structured process, we can improve our recruiting efforts and create a successful team.

The Struggle with Recruitment

Recruiting the right people for a team is the most important thing for any leader and CEO. However, it is a topic that is not taught in universities or in most workplaces. As a recruiter, my job is to find the right people for the team. When the right people are selected, the job becomes easy. However, selecting the wrong people can be costly, impacting productivity, profits, culture, and happiness.

According to the US Department of Labor, the cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%. The difference between average performance and top performance in a position is 67% productivity and bottom-line profits, according to McKenzie.

Leaders tend to make recruiting mistakes because nobody taught them how to recruit. Therefore, it is important to be proactive in seeking information to improve recruiting efforts.

One of the challenges in recruiting is cognitive biases. For instance, leaders tend to hire people who are similar to themselves, try to hire people who can do everything, and tend to hire people who are worse than themselves. However, selecting the right people is like building a football team – it’s not about finding someone who can do everything, but rather finding the best person for each position.

As a team, we set out to build a structured process that would make us much better at recruiting. Although we still have a lot to learn, we believe our framework can be one of the best in the world.

The Need for Proactive Recruitment

As a CEO and recruiter, I strongly believe that proactive recruitment is the most important skill for any leader to possess. It’s about setting up the right team and helping them achieve the results that will make them successful in their roles. However, it’s surprising that there are no university courses or books on the topic of proactive recruitment.

The cost of a bad hire is significant, with the US Department of Labor estimating it at 30% of the position’s salary. Furthermore, selecting the wrong person can impact the culture of the organization, limit growth, and even affect the happiness of both the leader and the employee.

At my company, we recognized our weakness in recruiting and set out to build a framework that would make us better at it. We understand that we still have a lot to learn and that our cognitive biases can hinder our efforts. For instance, we tend to hire people who are like us, try to find someone who can do everything, and even hire people who are worse than ourselves.

However, selecting the right people for the right roles is crucial, and it’s not about finding someone who can do everything. Instead, it’s like building a football team, where you need the best attacker, goalkeeper, and defender. As a leader, it’s not necessary to be the smartest person in the room, but to find people who are smarter and better than yourself.

In conclusion, proactive recruitment is a critical skill for any leader to possess, and it’s essential to recognize the importance of selecting the right people for the right roles. By being proactive and building a structured recruitment process, we can avoid bad hires and create a positive culture that fosters growth and success.

The Framework for Effective Recruitment

As a CEO and entrepreneur, I believe that effective recruitment is the most important thing for any leader to be good at. However, it’s interesting to note that there are no university courses or books on this topic, and it’s not something that is typically taught in leadership training.

To build the best team possible, we must focus on two things: selecting the right team members and helping them achieve the results that will make them successful in their roles. As a recruiter, my job is to find the right people for my organization, and if I select the right people, my job becomes much simpler.

However, selecting the wrong people can have significant negative impacts on an organization. The US Department of Labor estimates that the cost of a bad hire is 30% of their salary, and a study by McKinsey found that top performers in a position can be 67% more productive than average performers, while bottom performers can have a negative impact on bottom-line profits. Additionally, hiring the wrong person can impact an organization’s culture, employee happiness, and growth potential.

To improve our recruitment efforts, my team and I have developed a framework that we believe can be one of the best in the world. While we are still working to fully understand the complexities of effective recruitment and overcome our cognitive biases, we have identified some common pitfalls to avoid.

For example, we must avoid the tendency to hire people who are just like us or who can do everything. Instead, we should focus on hiring people who have the specific skills and strengths needed for the role. We should also aim to hire people who are smarter and better than ourselves, rather than settling for those who are worse.

By following a structured recruitment process and avoiding common biases, we can build the best team possible and achieve our organization’s goals.

Understanding Cognitive Biases

As a leader, one of the most important skills to possess is the ability to select and build the right team. However, selecting the right people can be a difficult task, especially when we are prone to cognitive biases.

Cognitive biases are mental shortcuts that our brains take when processing information. These shortcuts can lead to errors in judgment and decision-making. As humans, we are all susceptible to cognitive biases, and it is important to be aware of them when selecting team members.

Some of the cognitive biases that can impact our ability to select the right team members include:

  • Self-Similarity Bias: We tend to hire people who are similar to ourselves, even if they may not be the best fit for the role.
  • Halo Effect Bias: We tend to judge people based on one positive trait, such as their appearance or charisma, and overlook other important factors.
  • Confirmation Bias: We tend to seek out information that confirms our pre-existing beliefs and ignore information that contradicts them.
  • Overconfidence Bias: We tend to overestimate our own abilities and underestimate the abilities of others.

To overcome these biases, it is important to have a structured process in place when selecting team members. This process should involve objective criteria for evaluating candidates, such as their skills, experience, and fit with the company culture. It is also important to involve multiple people in the hiring process to ensure that biases are minimized.

By being aware of our cognitive biases and taking steps to overcome them, we can increase our chances of selecting the right team members and building a successful organization.

The Issue of Hiring Ourselves

As a leader, one of the most important things to be good at is selecting the right team and helping them achieve the desired results. However, it is surprising that there are no courses or books available on this topic. The lack of knowledge on this subject makes it difficult for leaders to recruit the right people for their team.

It is important to understand that selecting the right people is crucial for the success of any organization. A bad hire can cost up to 30% of the role’s salary, according to the US Department of Labor. Moreover, selecting the wrong person can negatively impact the culture of the organization, limit growth, and affect the happiness of both the leader and the team.

One of the common mistakes that leaders make is trying to hire people who are similar to themselves. This is because they believe that they are the best employee and that the person they select should have the same qualities as themselves. However, this approach can limit the diversity of the team and result in a lack of complementary skills.

Another mistake is trying to hire people who can do everything. Leaders should focus on selecting people who are the best in their respective roles, just like a football team has the best attacker, goalkeeper, and defender.

Lastly, leaders tend to hire people who are worse than themselves. However, this approach can limit the growth of the organization and prevent the leader from learning from their team. As a leader, it is important to hire people who are smarter and better than oneself.

To address these issues, our team has developed a structured process and framework to make recruiting much better. While we understand only 20% of what we need to know, we believe that our process can be one of the best in the world. We are aware of our cognitive biases, such as arrogance and cognitive biases, but we strive to improve our efforts to select the right people for our team.

The Problem of Hiring Jacks of All Trades

As a leader and CEO, one of the most important things to be good at is selecting the right team. However, nobody teaches us anything about it, and it’s hard to find any resources on the topic. Many people have advanced ideas of leadership, but I believe that Benjamin Sander, the conductor for the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, nails it when he says that leadership comes down to two things: setting the right team and helping those people achieve the results that will make them successful in their particular role.

As a recruiter, my job is to find the right people for the job. If I select the right people, my job is simple. However, if I don’t, my life becomes complicated. The cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%, and the difference between average performance and top performance in a position is 67% productivity and bottom-line profits. Hiring the wrong person not only impacts these numbers but also impacts culture, happiness, and growth.

One of the biggest issues in hiring is trying to find jacks of all trades. We try to hire people who can do everything, but selecting the right people is more like building a football team. You don’t want a person who’s good at everything; you want the best attacker, goalkeeper, and defender. Additionally, we tend to hire people who are worse than ourselves, but as a leader, it’s crucial to hire people who are smarter and better than yourself.

To combat these issues, my team and I have developed a structured process and framework that we believe can be one of the best in the world. However, we still have a lot to learn and understand, as we only leverage about 10% of what we need to understand due to cognitive biases like arrogance and overconfidence. As a leader, it’s essential to be proactive about seeking information to improve recruiting efforts.

The Dilemma of Hiring People Worse Than Myself

As a CEO and a recruiter, I strongly believe that selecting the right team is the most important thing for any leader. However, it’s surprising how little attention is given to this crucial aspect of leadership. There are no university courses or books that teach us how to select the right people for our team. It’s just assumed that we’ll know how to do it.

But the truth is, hiring the wrong person can have a significant impact on our company’s culture, productivity, and bottom-line profits. According to the US Department of Labor, the cost of a bad hire for any role is 30%. McKinsey takes it one step further and says that the difference between average and top performance in a position is 67% productivity and bottom-line profits.

Moreover, selecting the wrong person for a job not only affects the company’s growth but also limits the person’s growth and happiness. It’s no wonder that people spend 10% of their time recruiting and 90% of their time making up for recruiting mistakes.

One of the biggest mistakes we make as leaders is trying to hire people worse than ourselves. There’s a saying that goes, “A’s hire B’s, B’s hire C’s, and so on.” But this mentality is flawed. As a leader, my job is not to be the smartest person in the room but to find and select the smartest and best people for my team.

Another mistake we make is trying to hire people who can do everything. Just like a football team, we don’t need a person who’s good at everything. We need the best attacker, the best goalkeeper, and the best defender.

To overcome these biases and improve our recruiting efforts, we need a structured process and framework. At my company, we’ve developed a framework that we believe can be one of the best recruiting frameworks in the world. However, we’re still learning and improving, and there’s still much we don’t understand.

In conclusion, selecting the right team is critical for any leader’s success. We need to be proactive about seeking information and improving our recruiting efforts. By avoiding biases and using a structured process, we can select the best people for our team and achieve great success.

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Charlotte speaks with authority as RemotePad’s recruitment and HR tech maestro. With a background in marketing, Charlotte has worked for major brands in the industry, including leading HR software provider, FactorialHR. Originally from Manchester, UK, with a bachelor’s degree from the Manchester Metropolitan University, Charlotte currently resides in sunny Barcelona, Spain.

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