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How to Get a Denmark Work Visa & Work Permit: Requirements & Procedure

Denmark offers various work visas and permits depending on your qualifications. To obtain one, you must generally have a job offer and apply for a residence and work permit. Check the full guidelines and procedure in our article.

What are the different types of Denmark work visa?

  • The Positive List: This type of visa is for highly skilled workers who are in high demand in Denmark. The Positive List includes a list of specific occupations that are in demand, and individuals must have the necessary qualifications and experience for the occupation they are applying for.
  • The Pay Limit Scheme: This type of visa is for highly skilled workers who are not on the Positive List, but who are offered a job with a high salary. The salary threshold for this visa is currently DKK 432,000 (approximately €57,000) per year.
  • The Corporate Scheme: This type of visa is for employees of a multinational company who are being transferred to Denmark for work. The employee must have been working for the company for at least 6 months, and the company must have a branch or subsidiary in Denmark.
  • The Startup Scheme: This type of visa is for entrepreneurs and startup founders who are looking to set up their businesses in Denmark. The applicant must have a viable business idea, and be able to demonstrate that they have the necessary skills and experience to run the business.
  • The Greencard Scheme: This type of visa is for highly skilled workers who are not on the Positive List and do not qualify for the Pay Limit Scheme, but who have a specific set of qualifications and experience that make them suitable for Denmark’s labor market. The applicant must pass a point-based system to qualify for the Greencard Scheme.
  • The EU Blue Card: This type of visa is for highly skilled workers with a job offer in Denmark, and a minimum salary of DKK 37,752 (approx €5,033).

Please note that the above information is subject to change and it’s always best to consult with the Danish immigration authorities or a lawyer for the most up-to-date information.

What is the process for applying for a Denmark work visa?

The process for applying for a work visa in Denmark can vary depending on the specific type of work visa you are applying for and your individual circumstances. However, generally speaking, the process typically includes the following steps:

  • Job Offer: You must have a valid job offer from a Danish employer. Your employer must also have obtained a positive employment decision from the Danish immigration authorities, also known as the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI).
  • Application Form: You will need to fill out an application form and submit it along with the required documents.
  • Required Documents: You will need to provide a number of supporting documents with your application, including your passport, a copy of your job offer and employment contract, proof of your qualifications and work experience, and proof of your financial means.
  • Fees: You will need to pay a fee to cover the cost of processing your application.
  • Biometrics: You will be required to provide biometrics such as fingerprints and a photograph at a visa application center or a Danish mission.
  • Interview: You may be required to attend an interview with a Danish immigration official.
  • Processing Time: The processing time for a work visa application in Denmark can vary depending on the specific type of visa and your individual circumstances. It usually takes around 2-3 months for a decision to be made on your application.
  • Decision: You will be informed of the decision on your application by mail or email.

Please note that the above information is subject to change and it’s always best to consult with the Danish immigration authorities or a lawyer for the most up-to-date information.

Video: How to get a Work Visa in Denmark

What is the standard processing time for a Denmark work visa?

The processing time for a work visa in Denmark can vary depending on the specific type of visa and your individual circumstances. However, it generally takes around 3-4 months for a decision to be made on your application.

It’s important to note that processing time may also be affected by the workload of the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI) and the Embassy where you applied.

You should also take into account that you should apply for the visa well in advance of your intended start date of work, as it is better not to expect a quick processing time.

It’s always best to consult with the Danish immigration authorities or a lawyer for the most up-to-date information.

Do Denmark work visas require a sponsor?

In Denmark, you typically need sponsorship from an employer to apply for a work visa. Your employer must also have obtained a positive employment decision from the Danish immigration authorities, also known as the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI). This means that before you apply for a work visa, your employer must have obtained an offer of employment number from the SIRI, which is a confirmation that the position you will be filling is a qualified position and that no suitable candidates were found among the EU/EEA citizens.

Your employer will also be responsible for submitting the necessary paperwork and paying the fee for the employment permit.

It’s important to note that there are also some specific types of work visas that do not require sponsorship, such as the startup visa, the green card scheme, and the pay limit scheme.

It’s always best to consult with the Danish immigration authorities or a lawyer for the most up-to-date information regarding sponsorship.

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